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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update

Updated 17 March 2020

Haemochromatosis Australia is consulting with our medical advisors, health authorities and stakeholders to compile and share haemochromatosis related coronavirus information.

We have prepared some initial information for people with hereditary haemochromatosis below. This has been reviewed by our medical advisors. We will update and add to this information as more evidence-based and trusted information comes to hand.

If you have specific questions after reading this information, you can call our INFO LINE 1300 019 028 during business hours.

How can I find trusted information about coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Worried about coronavirus (also known as COVID-19) but not sure what to do?

Health Direct Australia is working with the Australian Government Department of Health to provide trusted evidence-based information about COVID-19 to the public.

Check the facts on Health Direct Coronavirus website hub. You will find the latest trusted information plus a Coronavirus Symptom Checker tool.

Are there specific risks associated with coronavirus (COVID-19) for people with hereditary haemochromatosis?

This strain of coronavirus (known as COVID-19) is a novel virus. It has emerged in recent months and so its interactions with people with genetic haemochromatosis have not been specifically studied.

However, while we are still learning about how COVID-19 affects people, older people and those with pre-existing medical conditions (such as high blood pressure, heart disease, lung disease, cancer or diabetes) appear to develop serious illness more often than others.

At this point there is no specific evidence to suggest an increased risk in people with HH of contracting coronavirus (COVID-19).

I have an appointment for a venesection, test or consultation with my GP or specialist.  Should I go?

Yes, unless you have symptoms of coronavirus or you have been told to self-isolate or you have been specifically instructed by medical or a government authority not to attend.

Advice from Australian Red Cross Lifeblood for therapeutic donors

Lifeblood are asking existing blood donors to keep their appointments if fit and well and invite new donors to come forward to help meet the needs of Australian patients. Therapeutic donors who are well and haven’t travelled are an important source of blood and we are keen for them to continue attending as per their venesection schedule.

 Lifeblood donor centres are safe places to visit and they are taking all necessary steps to ensure that stays the case.   

Lifeblood has introduced new measures to ensure the safety of the blood supply. These may change over time so we encourage therapeutic donors to check the Lifeblood website which will be updated regularly.

Basically anyone who has travelled overseas cannot donate for 28 days, This includes therapeutic donors. Anyone who is unwell or who has had contact with a COVID-19 case is also deferred.

For detailed information please visit Lifeblood’s Coronavirus update at https://www.donateblood.com.au/page/novel-coronavirus-update or call Lifeblood on 13 14 95.

I’ve been unable to attend venesection as usual, will that be a problem?

There may be various reasons why you are unable to attend a venesection. These could include your own ill-health with coronavirus, self-isolation resulting from a close relative’s infection or specific government or health authority advice.

If you have coronavirus (COVID-19) or are self-isolating, venesection is not a priority. Delaying a venesection by a few weeks or months will generally not have any lasting implications for your health. The priority will be to recover from the coronavirus and/or prevent infecting others.

If you have the symptoms of coronavirus or have been told to self-isolate

  • You should call your doctor before you go to the clinic and tell them about your symptoms,  travel history and whether you have been told to self-isolate. Tell them if you have been in close contact with a person with confirmed COVID-19 (including in the 24 hours before they became unwell). They will provide instructions on how to safely attend the appointment without putting yourself, other patients or staff at risk. You should follow their advice.
  • You should not attend your pharmacy, hospital or venesection centre.

This will help to reduce the risks of infecting others, including our hard-working health professionals.